Why is Restarting so Darn Hard?

If you are a regular reader of this blog, you might have noticed something during the summer. The blog stopped being regular. I dropped from one or two posts a week to less than one a month over the summer. And it took me most of September to get re-engaged. I’ve had breaks from posting before, and I’ve written about restarting, rebooting, reconnecting. Often those posts are about the reasons that we get disconnected from things that we enjoy, or things that are healthy for us.

This time around, I have been thinking about why it is tough to get restarted.

I love to write this blog. It allows me a creative outlet and it gives me a space to contribute to better brain health information online. Writing challenges me to keep thinking and growing, so that I can keep sharing new perspectives (not new ideas, because I don’t know if there are that many new ideas in emotional health). And yet, even after I was out of the craziness of my summer schedule, it has been incredibly hard to get back in the groove.

This has been a great reminder for me about other restarts that can be tough.

  • Restarting healthy boundaries
  • Restarting connections to values and priorities
  • Restarting self-care in the form of exercise, or eating healthy
  • Restarting emotionally challenging work like therapy or journalling

I believe that our difficulty in restarting is directly connected with the post I wrote a few days ago about vulnerability. When our routines get interrupted, that feels like a failure. When we re-engage with something that we care about, we open up the risk of failing again. So, restarting a behavior that has been stopped means being vulnerable to the challenge of maintaining a healthy routine. When we admit and announce a goal, we become vulnerable to the possibility that we will not reach it.

Being vulnerable is scary. And it can be easy to let that vulnerability paralyze us.

A lesson that I keep learning is that it is better to start and get interrupted than to remain still. I may not reach my goal of blogging every week (or making healthy choices, or being exactly the parent I want to be). But I have a hell of a lot better chance of getting to that goal if I am in motion. And even if I don’t make the goal, I have made progress. I have grown and stretched and produced. So, once again, I am restarting.

What do you want to restart? Feel free to share in the comments or contact me directly.

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