Posts Tagged ‘breast cancer’

Is it Time for a Break?

One of my best mental health breaks is getting outside.

Next Monday, August 24th, I’ll be joining the #BCSM (Breast Cancer and Social Media) community again for their Monday night tweet chat.  Our topic is going to be “mental health breaks.”  I’ve been kicking this idea around in my head for a while, and one of the things that has come up for me is that many of the clients I work with in the office, as well as people that I interact with in health communities really struggle with the idea of taking a break.

Living with cancer can be a consuming experience.  It can feel like a full-time job to manage early treatment, and a very different job to cope with ongoing fatigue, chemobrain, and other long-term treatment effects.  In addition to that, cancer and other illness can be like an earthquake in your relationships and work life.  It makes a lot of sense that trying to create mental health breaks can feel unattainable or like a chore.

And all of that is why making space for breaks matters.  When your body has taken huge hits, and so much of your experience has been wrenched out of your control, it becomes really important to focus on what you can control.  And investments (big and small) in your overall mental health are definitely under your control.

So let’s look at some of the reasons we aren’t getting these mental health breaks.

Reason 1: I don’t have time to do that stuff.

Baloney.  Mental health breaks don’t need to be a week-long vacation. or an hour of meditation.  Not that either of those are bad.  You can give yourself a mental break in under one minute.  Try focusing for 10-12 seconds on a sensation of comfort, connection, or pleasure–the taste of your coffee, the sound of kids laughing, the warmth of a favorite blanket.  For that 10-12 seconds, really immerse yourself in how good that moment feels. Try to identify how you are seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, or feeling that goodness. This is an exercise that neuroscientist Rick Hanson calls “taking in the good.”

Reason 2:  Treatment has taken up so much of my time, energy, money, etc that I don’t have any resources left over to take care of my mental health.

It can be easy to think of mental health & self-care as luxury items, but they aren’t.  Not only are they absolutely essential to our overall health, but you can take a break for your mental health in ways that don’t take up more of your resources.  You can change your scenery (get outside, get to a lovely indoor space, add a plant to your desk or bedroom).  You can move around–even some gentle stretches can begin to release endorphins & lift your mood.  You can breathe–3-5 deep breaths are enough to reset a stressed out-brain.

Reason 3:  It’s not fair to my spouse/kids/family/friends/employer if I focus on me. Isn’t that selfish?

Nope. No way. Not at all. Not even a little. Self-care is not selfish.  Focusing on mental health actually helps you be a better partner, parent, friend or co-worker.  Just think about how you act and feel when you are exhausted or upset.  Is it your best self? Can you make good judgments and extend compassion? I can’t.  I need to have a basic foundation of rest, self-care, and mental health time outs, so that I can be the best person possible in my relationships.  Taking mental health breaks helps me (and you) to be the person that others count on.  Without those breaks, we are all more brittle and likely to, well, break.

This is just a tiny sampling of how you can challenge the blocks to your own mental health breaks.  Want more? Join us on Monday night for the #BCSM Community tweet chat.

 

Advertisements
davidwcovington.com

Beyond Behavioral Health

hcldr

Healthcare Leadership Blog

Figuring. Shit. Out.

life seems to dish it out. i seem to write about it.

wellfesto

hacking health, designing life

Just Talking Podcast

A free-flowing conversation with purpose. There's no pressure, we're Just Talking

A Consequence of Hypoglycemia.

What good is an incurable disease if you can’t share it with the rest of the world.

inDpendence

Sometimes Diabetes Takes Center Stage

regrounding

of chemo, cancer and facing life head-on

Dr Catherine Rose

Inspiring Hope

Telling Knots

About 30% of people diagnosed with breast cancer at any stage will develop distal metastasis. I am one.

Ann Becker-Schutte, Ph.D.

Help at the Intersection of Physical and Emotional Health

eatbreatherun

Eating, Running & Fighting Against Lung Cancer

Is it Possible?

Making it Possible in 10 steps or less!

Warm Southern Breeze

"... there is no such thing as nothing."

health communication source

curating the people & organizations that make health com happen

The Musings of a Cancer Research Advocate

It's All About the Evidence...

shadow7788

The greatest WordPress.com site in all the land!

Tonya Miles, PsyD

Mental Health Matters

The Pollock Group

Professional Psychology Services

Voice in Recovery (ViR)™

Prevention, Advocacy, Intervention, Recovery (PAIR)™